More thought on things “deserved”

I had also put up my last post on Facebook, and had gotten a response that led me to believe I┬áconfused people with it. That they thought maybe I didn’t believe there were people in this world that do help. That wasn’t really what I meant. Here was my more in-depth response trying to clear it up.


 

Oh, no doubt there are beautiful people in this world that are willing to help others out, I know that for certain, and I’m still an optimist that there are more good people in this world than the impression we get from listening to the news.

I just meant more that I’ve seen a lot of posts recently over things where instead of being willing to allow someone the ability to better themselves, or become more stable, that other people’s responses have been that those individuals don’t “deserve” to be helped, and that they need to make it on their own. Sentiment a lot of the time seems to be that somehow the only way someone “deserves” help is if they’ve “worked hard” and are already in a stable situation to where they can afford it in the first place, and it just made me think. We’ve all had undeserved blessings in our lives.. why would we be more deserving than someone else who could use a blessing to then put themselves in a more stable situation?

Things like helping more kids obtain higher education. Yes, people should “work for it”, but at the same time I know plenty of people who would have loved to get a higher education, but pure and simply did not have the attempts they did make fall into place to allow them access because they also had other responsibilities… like being able to eat, or pay rent. To me that is a lot of community potential wasted, and whither we want to admit it or not, the attitude of not helping people – affects our communities, country, and even world we live in.

Even some of these places deciding that someone fleeing their birth home, looking for safety, is somehow automatically just as guilty as the people they are fleeing from. To me it just doesn’t seem right when we all know that no one chooses where they are born. We clamor for people to take initiative and do something to change their own lives, and then when some do, people still have the nerve to warrant them as being unworthy of being helped.. That is what eats at me a little bit. We are social beings, and we ALL need help time to time. Place of origin should never define us, its where we are going that matters.

Sometimes I think we have to be honest about our own attitudes. In truth its not always so much that others “don’t deserve” help becoming stable, more often it seems like subconsciously its either an excuse for us not to help, or a way to continue to feel we have some sort of superiority over someone, because we can tell ourselves “least we’re better than that person”. I just don’t think its moral to deny assistance over maintaining our own personal pride. We all have been helped once in awhile, without it being necessarily based on our own merit. Sometimes its those times that are the most pivotal in making us better people in the first place, to be shown grace and love when we didn’t necessarily “deserve” it. I just wanted to encourage some thought into looking at the root of our own beliefs when we judge how much someone else “deserves”.

A thought on things “deserved”

I just wonder sometimes how many of us would actually be willing to give up the blessings and bright aspects we’ve received in our own lives in the interest of making this world a more “fair” place.

We seem to clamor for that especially when we feel someone is particularly undeserving of something. Often deciding that those that have had a harder time, haven’t tried hard enough or obviously somehow “deserve” less than we do.

The fact is that regardless of our own ability to admit it, we’ve all been blessed a time or two where it could honestly be argued that we didn’t “deserve” whatever opportunity or aspect life gave us.

Perhaps before we judge or decide so quickly for others (especially those we’ve not bothered getting to know), what they do, or don’t “deserve” we should consider that that might not be the right question to ask, nor the right focus. Maybe the right question to ask, is how moral are we as individuals, and how moral and civilized and giving we want our neighbors to have the opportunity to be.